Upper Endoscopy and Colonoscopy

Upper Endoscopy and Colonoscopy

Upper endoscopy

Upper endoscopy is an outpatient procedure wherein the inside of the upper part of your gastrointestinal tract (esophagus, stomach and duodenum) is examined and investigated. Common reasons to perform an upper endoscopy  is to evaluate symptoms such as abdominal pain, acid reflux, nausea or vomiting and difficulty swallowing. An upper endoscopy is performed using a device called a gastroscopy. The gastroscope is a long, thin, flexible tube, which is attached to a small video camera and connected to a TV monitor. Using the various controls that are part of the device, the gastroenterologist guides the instrument to visualize the lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract and look for lesions such as ulcers,  polyps, tumors, abnormal blood vessels, inflammation etc.

Before an upper endoscopy: Your doctor will give you instructions to hold certain medications and not eat or drink for a specific period of time before the procedure

During upper endoscopy: At the discretion of the supervising physician, you will receive sedation prior to and during the procedure to keep you comfortable. You may experience slight short-lived discomfort during the procedure as the gastroscope is advanced to the end of your colon. If an abnormality is seen through the scope, a small amount of tissue may be removed for analysis (biopsy), or in the case of benign polyps, may be fully removed. Biopsy or polyp removal is typically painless.

After an upper endoscopy: You will be taken to a recovery area where you will be monitored until the full effects of the sedating medication have worn off. You may feel some cramping or gas sensation that usually passes quickly. The physician may recommend that Certain medications, such as blood thinners, be avoided for a few days if the tissue samples or polyps were removed.

Alcohol, driving, regular outdoor activities, and operation of heavy machinery must be avoided until after 24 hours following the colonoscopy. Unless otherwise instructed, you can return to your normal diet immediately after the colonoscopy.

Colonoscopy

Colonoscopy is an outpatient procedure wherein the inside of your large bowel (colon and rectum) is examined and investigated. Common reasons to perform a colonoscopy is to screen for colon cancer or polyps, or to evaluate symptoms such as abdominal pain and rectal bleeding A colonoscopy is performed using a device called a colonoscope. The colonoscope is a long, thin, flexible tube, which is attached to a small video camera and connected to a TV monitor. Using the various controls that are part of the device, the gastroenterologist guides the instrument to visualize the lining of the colon and look for lesions such as polyps, tumors, abnormal blood vessels, inflammation etc.

Before a colonoscopy: Your doctor will give you instructions to cleanse your colon so that the entire lining can be visualized during the procedure. Such cleansing typically involves staying on a liquid diet for 1 or more day before the procedure, taking laxatives and drinking large amount of fluids.

During colonoscopy: At the discretion of the supervising physician, you will receive sedation prior to and during the procedure to keep you comfortable. You may experience slight short-lived discomfort during the procedure as the colonoscope is advanced to the end of your colon. If an abnormality is seen through the scope, a small amount of tissue may be removed for analysis (biopsy), or in the case of benign polyps, may be fully removed. Biopsy or colon polyp removal is typically painless.

After a colonoscopy: You will be taken to a recovery area where you will be monitored until the full effects of the sedating medication have worn off. You may feel some cramping or gas sensation that usually passes quickly. The physician may recommend that Certain medications, such as blood thinners, be avoided for a few days if the tissue samples or polyps were removed.

Minor bleeding might occur at the site where polyps or tissue samples have been removed, but this usually goes away within a few days.

Alcohol, driving, regular outdoor activities, and operation of heavy machinery must be avoided until after 24 hours following the colonoscopy. Unless otherwise instructed, you can return to your normal diet immediately after the colonoscopy.